Old Meadows conservation area consultation

Held by OMTRA at Meadows Library.
Around 25 residents attended.
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Chainey Place

150 new homes on the final part of the Hicking Buildings site and re-using the front wall of a Victorian warehouse.
Known previously as Hicking Buildings phase 3, Chainey Place draws its name from how the area, once very boggy, was bridged by walkways held together by chains.
The building had few complaints at the Planning committee cos of the care taken to re-use existing attractive wall, use of bricks for decoration, a strong main entrance and a curved corner where the building will be most prominent – on the corner of the Crocus Street and London Road junction.
Although quoted as having no complaints, I did ask for section 106 money to be made available to place a half multi-use games area and a separate goal on the green off Arkwright Walk.

Student flats and private rent apartments for west of Arkwright Street

On a cleared site once known as the Cresswell site, a proposal for a two-halves was approved at Planning committee.
I had expected the community to object in previous times, but when community reps met developers in September, they were impressed with the proposals.
I intervened a week previous to ensure section 106 money was contributed – £100,000 was agreed in time for the committee meeting.
More notes to follow.
N Post article.

Columbus

Shot in Columbus, Indiana. Viewed on Columbus Day.  And I had no idea.

Columbus is a very good film.  You’ll no doubt find the story slow.  And perhaps less entertaining than you’d hope.
But you gotta go see.
Great acting. Great ethos. Great shots. Great architecture and interior design.  Drawing on extraordinary hallmarks of other great directors.
(r:9.5.; s:4, e:4, t:7 (out of 5).)
So much so, I’ve broken my already broken rating system, but in a new way. 7 out of 5 for the technical aspects.

The core of the story is a high school (check) graduate who is mature beyond her years because of her love for her mother and the support she’s given to help the mother through a drug-addiction.  She loves cooking for her mum, her home city and loves its specialist architecture.  She’s bright but is choosing to stay home to help her Mum rather than break out.  Catalyst for the breaking out from this life is the son of an architect,  who’s come to the city cos his father has fallen seriously hill.  And they develop a bond cos they can talk with each other beyond her joy in telling stories of the local buildings. And with all the potential for “drama”, not one argument, not one strop.  Such an antidote to soap operas and many films.

Now, I didn’t know about Columbus, Indiana (population 44,000).  That it’s home to many exemplary modernist buildings cos of the vision of a wealthy couple and the husband who managed a successful local engine manufacturing company.
So beautiful buildings were commissioned, from the fifties on.
Now, the controversy – cos The Guardian in reviewing the film describes the beautiful buildings as brutalist.  With my limited knowledge of architecture drawn from membership of the planning committee, I don’t think they are brutal.  Not least cos of the massive space often available to these buildings – something Nottingham doesn’t have room for; nor does modern British capitalism (e.g. Station Street).
Yet the weaknesses of the buildings restarting to come through, even in the film; the weathering showing the buildings often don’t know how to manage the rain.
So architects and planners should also go see this film, if only to take in the success and the failings.

 

OMTRA meet to consider conservation area for the Old Meadows

20180925 1915 ML omtra conservation area 42494201_10155882076496305_5180883925198700544_oAround 50 residents met to consider how the planning system could be used to defend the defining features of the Old Meadows, in a way that every property owner would have to obey.
Using a conservation order, of which there are 32 in the city, perhaps the three strongest ideas are –
– consistency in roof tiling – most rooves to be slate or slate lookalike;
(Visit Wollaton Park Estate to see what happens when the 1930’s design code was ignored);
– requiring front boundary walls to be kept in Bulwell stone (or its Ilkeston/Alfreton lookalike);
– keeping the depth of window reveals to be consistent with original specifications.
Could usefully have explored views on allowing higher walls at the rear properties, or not. (It seems unlikely that an adopted plan would be used to require property owners. to undo changes already made, )
The boundary proposed need to be reviewed too – should the more modern eco-houses be in or not?
And what might a conservation area do for the potential development sites at the former Old Toll Bridge pub site, and at the former Collygate school site off Wilford Grove?
OMTRA are now collecting opinions and will present a summary report to a future public meeting.