Supporting the Hong Kong protestors from Nottingham

Angharad Roberts said “Glad to speak at this morning’s rally for #HongKongProtests in #Nottingham. Moving to hear the speeches and songs of so many young Hong Kong campaigners.”

I spoke to say that Britain and Nottingham have worked to develop partnerships with China, but the treatments of Muslims in China and of protestors in Hong Kong iss setting us back.
Thought the Sino-British Joint Declaration leaflet was particularly clear.

Video available
Photos available

Advertisements

Boris Johnson loses

He called an address from Downing Street but pulled his punches.
He spoke to there G7 conference to Parliament, but his jab at Jeremy Corbyn fell flat.
As he spoke, a Conservative MP crossed the floor to join the Lib Dems.
His majority of 1 was lost.
21 Conservative MPs refused to vote with him and he lost by 27.
He’s withdrawn the. whip and now his minority is 43.
He days he’ll call a General Election, but the combined opposition don’t have to agree to one, and will wait until they’re certain that No Deal can’t be passed will Parliament is not sitting.
An ERG Conservative MP claimed today that the proposed General Election Day of 14th October can’t stick because it is a Jewish holiday – and he may be right – but it just exemplified how they can’t be trusted on the date.

It’s been strange during the last few days as the language has slipped from ‘our party is the best’ to ‘we must defend the importance of accountability of the executive to Parliament’.
And if Boris Johnson and Dominic Cummings think they can turn the debate into the people vs Parliament and be popular, the snap polls suggested they are wrong. He was pressed 3 times on obeying the law, despite saying he would at the second attempt, cos he muttered. his agreement like a six year old who didn’t’t want to say he was wrong.
Corbyn is apparently to suffer a setback cos he won’t yet agree to a General Election, but he should stick with it for fear of a Johnson trick and because the answer – Johnson can’t be trusted – bears repetition.

Anti Prorogation rally and march

Two thousand people took part in this protest against the prorogation of Parliament.
Outstanding speech by Cllr. Angharad Roberts.
Some great wit and colour.
Fuller res. photos available on Facebook.

A march followed.
Then another rally, at which Vernon Coaker MP spoke.
Fuller res. photos available on Facebook.

Vita and Virginia

Went cos I thought I ought to know more about Vita Sackville-West and Virginia Woolf, writers and part of Britain’s radical and feminist history.
Knew the film had lukewarm reviews, but thought it was important to go.
The movie covers the period of their love affair, and the writing of a resultant novel called “Orlando“.
Radical maybe, but also posh (terribly so), and dealing with literature at a level I don’t know about, so yeah, I’m lukewarm about the film too.
But no regrets about going. Too long for some, but there’s a lot to cover.
And beyond the story and the themes covered, great sets, fashion, locations and motor cars. Wiki. Guardian.

New Towns, Our Towns

New Towns, Our Town – Stories on Screen is a collection of (often sponsored information) films “about (mainly) the first four of the UK’s New Towns – Stevenage, Crawley, Hemel Hempstead and Harlow” from the ’20s to the ’80s. (Peterborough, Basildon and Milton Keynes also feature.)
Without an overarching explanatory narration, and presentations of contemporary perceptions of the towns, the criticisms of the new towns movements quickly spring to mind – lacking a central feature of distinction, designed before the take-off of car ownership, vulnerable during periods of high crime, diminished by people choosing home entertainment, home drinking and shopping in hypermarkets, oh and buying from internet companies who avoid paying tax.
But new and old towns alike have been vulnerable to that criticism. As are the redeveloped neighbourhoods and new suburbs.
Seeing “Crosswall” properties being erected, and the failure of (Harlow) Town Hall, it’s clear the New Towns movement didn’t have enough money to always provide quality.
Cliches abounded – “it’s about people”; loads of kids playing and adults bowling; modern art statues and fountains lined with small square tiles. And one I actually like – success will be when they don’t need us (the development corporations) anymore.
Loads to take in, but in the absence of editorial, the collation struggles to champion the New Town movement.
Highlight, the champion for the Milton Keynes development describing it in 1973 as “the most exciting thing in the world”.
The Guardian article.