Zen

Zen, bought with Bolt and intended as pets for the home and as company for each other.
Thought originally to be a pied cock budgie, but was most probably a spangle hen budgie.
Featured on 2 Christmas cards cos of 2 striking poses – both completely untypical – cos budgies don’t really smile and the practice of hanging upside on a maiden’s clothes line was given up.
Died far too early at just over 2 years, from organ failure.
Hard to attribute personalities to such small animals, but the contrast with her black-eyed albino friend could be striking, and the most striking difference stayed – that Bolt will scarper whilst Zen was more relaxed.
Fond memories.

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Kilo the Staffordshire Terrier

8 years old and the companion of a homeless man and woman eking out an existence in Telford. 
Having been first given up, and then badly cared for by someone who tried to help but couldn’t, he was adopted by the couple and has since trebled in weight.
He behaved very well on the train and enjoyed a packet of cheese and onion crisps in a very mannered way. (Apparently, he couldn’t have had salt & vinegar crisps.)

BR steam engine 34052 at Shrewsbury railway station

Arriving at Salop, as I was waiting for a train to Brum, this BR steam engine arrived, pulling a Pullman collection of carriages.  
A tad emotional cos my Dad was a locomotive engineer, though starting with the LMS part of BR, and serving from Salop, I think it is unlikely he would have driven this engine. (Advice welcome.). 

From wikipedia – 
“Steam locomotives that comprised the Bulleid light pacifics, the West Country and Battle of Britain classes of locomotives that ran on the British Southern Railway network …”

Fuller res photos available.

Away

Guilsfield, Hanwoodbank, Hanwood, Bishops Castle, Clun and Welshpool.

Visited my sister’s home, my old home, and its village church, Bishop’s Castle, Club Castle and Welshpool.

Also went to see Salop take on Oxford United, needing only a point to guarantee safety.
Oxford took the lead despite their forward using the arm to control the ball.
No particular surprise that Salop soon got what might have been perceived as a soft penalty.
Whatever, looking forward to the use of VAR growing.
Salop were leading t half-time, but gave a ineffective second-half performance, and lost in a tame way.

They gave “likes” to egg a murderer on

from The Guardian

49 killed.

Came home, just, to hear the tail-end of a pundit on BBC News tv saying Muslims can do more to tackle the aspects of their beliefs that lead to terrorism.
Well maybe, maybe not.

But imagine my surprise when the news explains the culprit was a white Australian right-winger.  

So some focus please.
– 
And arrests for those sharing the videos and those publishing comments supporting the killing.  
– 
and I’ve just been told by a journalist “we’ve got to change our behaviour”.
No, we’ve got to prosecute those who’ve done it and encouraged it.

Now, no doubt there are things for social media suppliers to tackle.
But they should not be the focus.
It’s those that did and those that encouraged it who should be prioritised.

The BBC are not helping by dumbing down their output. This morning’s explanation of Parliament not being able to reach a resolution is an example of that.
– 
And yesterday morning’s chat show finished with a man repeatedly shouting down the line that those who were supporting Remain were guilty of treachery.  
The media wind people up and then let the hatred spread.  
– 
So enough of the we care line from them.
Please, a focus showing people at our best, and being at their best even when they disagree.

But that’s for after those who encouraged the massacre are found.

The graphic exaggerates to make the point, but the point needs making. BBC tv, who I don’t take to be biased between left and right, but did have this hand-wringing stuff suggesting we were all at fault for this one; and we are not.
So yeah, if the culprit is charged, and his helpers, then prosecute all those who liked the transmissions and egged the murderer on as well.

Meanwhile, some of the 50 killed.

Ladies in Lavender

Sad story of 2 sisters who’ve lost in love and whose yearnings are stirred by the rescue of a young man washed up on the beach. Further frustration for a widower doctor who develops a crush on a young woman painter enjoying the Cornish seaside.
Performed in Oswestry by Attfield Theatre company who care for the arts, on an excellent set.
Wiki.

Conjugate the verb “have not”

A survey by the New York Times prompting people from Britain and Ireland to add to a pool of surveys showing. how people say they say words or express things.
And great fun it is too.
And the results correlate with my growing up just outside Shrewsbury.
The weaknesses become clear when I tried the first 25 questions for a second time a fortnight after the first and then went on to do the 96 questions.
Cos the first 2 results had varied – so perhaps I’d been inconsistent (possible) and perhaps the pool had changed the results.
And the resultants areas are incredibly wide Midlands west and east, but not the West Midlands former metro county and not the North Midlands.
Now the BBC and Shropshire Star has some articles on accents and slang, but there is actually a Shropshire dictionary, which includes the use of the words “mon” (kinda like “mate”) and I seem to recall has the conjugatants of our most common verbs (have not – I anna, you anna, he/she anna, we anna, you anna, they anna). Oh yes.
The book has a map of the dialects and they go down to parcels 3 miles by 2 miles wide. My village, Handwoodbank, part of Great Hanwood, has a dialect given the name of North Chuch Pulverbatch, which is a bit of an insult cos Church Pulverbatch was just a hamlet.
Now, can anyone guess what yourkin means?