They gave “likes” to egg a murderer on

from The Guardian

49 killed.

Came home, just, to hear the tail-end of a pundit on BBC News tv saying Muslims can do more to tackle the aspects of their beliefs that lead to terrorism.
Well maybe, maybe not.

But imagine my surprise when the news explains the culprit was a white Australian right-winger.  

So some focus please.
– 
And arrests for those sharing the videos and those publishing comments supporting the killing.  
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and I’ve just been told by a journalist “we’ve got to change our behaviour”.
No, we’ve got to prosecute those who’ve done it and encouraged it.

Now, no doubt there are things for social media suppliers to tackle.
But they should not be the focus.
It’s those that did and those that encouraged it who should be prioritised.

The BBC are not helping by dumbing down their output. This morning’s explanation of Parliament not being able to reach a resolution is an example of that.
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And yesterday morning’s chat show finished with a man repeatedly shouting down the line that those who were supporting Remain were guilty of treachery.  
The media wind people up and then let the hatred spread.  
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So enough of the we care line from them.
Please, a focus showing people at our best, and being at their best even when they disagree.

But that’s for after those who encouraged the massacre are found.

The graphic exaggerates to make the point, but the point needs making. BBC tv, who I don’t take to be biased between left and right, but did have this hand-wringing stuff suggesting we were all at fault for this one; and we are not.
So yeah, if the culprit is charged, and his helpers, then prosecute all those who liked the transmissions and egged the murderer on as well.

Meanwhile, some of the 50 killed.

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Ladies in Lavender

Sad story of 2 sisters who’ve lost in love and whose yearnings are stirred by the rescue of a young man washed up on the beach. Further frustration for a widower doctor who develops a crush on a young woman painter enjoying the Cornish seaside.
Performed in Oswestry by Attfield Theatre company who care for the arts, on an excellent set.
Wiki.

Conjugate the verb “have not”

A survey by the New York Times prompting people from Britain and Ireland to add to a pool of surveys showing. how people say they say words or express things.
And great fun it is too.
And the results correlate with my growing up just outside Shrewsbury.
The weaknesses become clear when I tried the first 25 questions for a second time a fortnight after the first and then went on to do the 96 questions.
Cos the first 2 results had varied – so perhaps I’d been inconsistent (possible) and perhaps the pool had changed the results.
And the resultants areas are incredibly wide Midlands west and east, but not the West Midlands former metro county and not the North Midlands.
Now the BBC and Shropshire Star has some articles on accents and slang, but there is actually a Shropshire dictionary, which includes the use of the words “mon” (kinda like “mate”) and I seem to recall has the conjugatants of our most common verbs (have not – I anna, you anna, he/she anna, we anna, you anna, they anna). Oh yes.
The book has a map of the dialects and they go down to parcels 3 miles by 2 miles wide. My village, Handwoodbank, part of Great Hanwood, has a dialect given the name of North Chuch Pulverbatch, which is a bit of an insult cos Church Pulverbatch was just a hamlet.
Now, can anyone guess what yourkin means?

Intense and pressing

Salop vs Charlton c morris scores copyright getty images gdn 4781 cartoonize ab0548h
However much I resent the play-offs when Salop finished third and so far ahead of the rest, the intensity of play-offs are evident.
The high pressing was again evident in the first half, but this time not so the control.  Missed passes, slipping cos of poor stud choices and poor decisions.
Just into the second half, it all came true and the pressure was non-stop for fifteen minutes, until triangles on the right wing led to an early strike from 8 yards that was driven before the keeper could get down.
As the half progressed, Salop fell back more, but it was under control and Salop progressed.
Not so controlled were the Salop fans who invaded the pitch to provoke Addicks fans, and some of them should have been expelled.
Another excellent photo by Gettys.
So Salop are on their way to Wembley.  If we can employ the pressing again, we shold be OK.

Welcome home

Confident of a scoreless draw, but hopeful of an occasion, it’s taken watching the full match coverage on tv to realise that it wasn’t much of an occasion except for the Salop fans who were there. We were engrossed for the first three-quarters.


Highlights from watching the game –
– pleased as punch to welcome Joe Hart back;
– delighted too that Dean Henderson was allowed to play by Manchester United;
– Salop were strongest in the second quarter and the pressing was excellent;
– our centre-halves Toto and Sadler were brilliant;
– When Sadler went off for five minutes, we actually kept the ball in their half.
WP_20180107_14_11_55_Pro (2) Salop shoot against West Ham
Didn’t appreciate until seeing the tv coverage –
– West Ham had played their strongest available team,
– West Ham only had 4 touches in our box;
– we’d booed a West Ham player who’d had a front tooth kicked out
(our scepticism kinda kicked off with Hernandez kneeling at kick-off and then hamming up a knock).


Track 5: “Ceremony”, Joy Division

Something of a surprise that a band attracting national attention was playing at High Hall, a hall of residence at the University of Birmingham – but a very welcome one.
A fan through listening to John Peel, I’d seen them supporting the Buzzcocks six months or so previous.
I’d gone in my usual blue Littlewoods shirt (never one for fashion), and starting swaying to the very first song – “Ceremony“.  You just got into the groove and started dancing.  I’d even hung around towards the back so I’d got space to move.
There was a bit of a commotion when the lead singer appeared to have collapsed but he came back on.
Not long after, Buzzcocks did a BBC Radio 1 live concert and my mate looked at each other slightly confused when Pete Shelley said “this one’s for Ian Curtis who died last night”.
It wasn’t until almost a week later that an NME poster made it clear to us that he was the Joy Division lead singer.  And it’s kinda how we were – you liked the music, and didn’t worry about the individuals artists; against strut. But once we knew who he was – horrible shock.
This was to be the celebrity death that had the most impact on me, and of course the story has become very well known with 2 movies (a lot of “Control” was filmed in Nottingham and Mapperley Hills) and lots of documentaries, and even one of a series of 4 posters celebrating the event – the actual poster for the night got the date wrong and black biro was used to fill in the errant number “2”.


The recording of the concert was to be the second half of a double album of collected songs, despite one of the mikes not recording the first part of the vocals of “Ceremony” at a proper level.  (I was there, but I can’t hear myself …)
Even so, it’s my favourite version, of my favourite Joy Division song.

Track 5: “Ceremony”, Joy Division, from Still album, live recording from May 2nd, 1980 at Birmingham University.

Previous track – “Making plans for Nigel”, XTC.