Spring 2020

Spring 2020 looks set to be spent at home in a new and different way.

Victoria Embankment Memorial Gardens lottery award

City Council officers, MeGA volunteers and OMTRA activists celebrate the good news; centre – proposed visitor centre.

Good news. as the bid to renew the Memorial Gardens took the next big step to delivering a renewal and history presentation project worth around £1.7 million.
Key to the quality of the bid is the knowledge and experience of City Council officers; key to the creditability of the bid is the support of the volunteers group – the Memorial Gardens Association – and OMTRA.

“Nottingham City Council is celebrating after receiving the news that its £130,000 initial bid to restore the Victoria Embankment Memorial Gardens has been successful. 
“The money has been awarded through the National Lottery Heritage Fund and will be used to improve facilities and create a visitor centre on the park. Nottingham City Council and other funding partners have also contributed with match funding.
“The announcement to return the park to its former glory marks the culmination of a development journey which has included two rounds of public consultation. The views of park users, veteran groups and the Friends Group [MEGA] about how the gardens and its facilities could be developed have identified a strong desire to see the area restored and improved.
“First stage of work will be developing the designs and plans, leading to a Delivery stage bid. This would then deliver the following:

  • Restoring the war Memorial which was unveiled in 1927
  • Restoring Queen Victoria’s Statue (dating from 1903) which has been in the gardens since 1953 (previously it sat in the Old Market Square)
  • Restoring the pond and fountains
  • Improving paths and access
  • Re-planting original flower beds
  • Installing new furniture
  • Creation of a visitor centre and toilets.

“An ongoing Activity Plan for the gardens will also set out how the restoration work and activities including historical research and links to both the physical and virtual Roll of Honours. The council will also work with various veteran organisations to help provide work experience and a pathway to help gain permanent employment. It is also proposed to create a Park Co-Ordinator post and two placements over five years. Engagement with the current and future park users will ensure that a legacy can be passed down from generation to generation.”

Above taken from City Council press release. Nottingham Post article.

A high River Trent – February 2020

Reluctant to refer to the high water as floods, since the water is going where it is designed to go when the river is high; so yes, the Wilford rugby pitches are under water, the Queens Drive park & ride site is under water (it was originally call Clifton Washlands, because the site was constructed in the flood plain, knowing it would go under water on occasions); the Baines restaurant can’t be properly accessed. But no properties have been lost in the conurbation – whilst I think they have been in Gunthorpe.

Walked The Embankment in case the high water was causing undue problems.
Did not find anything significant high water issues and only found a few non-water issues, so here’s my montage of dark brown photos instead …

MineFest

A community festival prompted by Bridges Community Trust, with an emphasis on the mining history of The Meadows, drawing from the Clifton Colliery.
Bilsthorpe Colliery brought their extensive display.
OMTRA and Meadows Diabetics Society shared a stall.
The Scouts and Guides were there too.
(Fuller res. photos available on Facebook.)

The bandstand was in use again, this time for folk music.

Forest fans may have witnessed the folk music after the match.
Meanwhile, the new WWI memorial has been repaired / finished.
(Fuller res. photos available on Facebook.)