Panthers hold out for 47 minutes to win 5-2

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First ice hockey game.
Four nil to GMB Nottingham Panthers against Sheffield Steelers after 12 minutes seems very one-sided.
4-1 after second half.
Panthers been concentrating on keeping players between the ball and the goal.
Nottingham’s goalkeeper has had less to save but has stopped a number of daisy-cutters.

Went on a last minute whim when I heard the end of season cup quarter-final against rivals from Sheffield was not sold out – I suspect cos of late organisation.
4-0 after 12 minutes completely threw me – it was like easy when no-one suggested it would be.   Lots of noise.
Then it was kind of 47 and 3/4 minutes Steelers moving it around and GMB Panthers defending – and only conceding when they were one player down.
BTW, always referred to as the GMB Panthers – which is great.
A lot less violent than I was led to believe.
The woman next to me had predicted dirty tricks in the second half and outright violence in the third, but, really it was more like tea and cucumber sandwiches from the 1930s.  Indeed, “what’s happened, have they changed the rules?”, and “it’s like Celebrity on Ice!”
A player’s inability to control stands out much more than in football.
Then with 15 seconds to go, a charge up the wing, a hook back and a smash in on the angle from the other side and it was 5-2 – quite a finale.
No surprise that player of the match went to the goalkeeper.  Now GMB Panthers have to hold out with their three goal lead in Sheffield in the second leg.
And thanks to colleagues for biting on the football terminology used above.


For a proper write-up, check out the Nottingham Post.

Nottingham Panthers’ European Trophy win celebrated by city

A civic reception for winning the Continental Cup and fans were still waiting outside to have their shirts signed.  16463746_10154324701161305_6857016764540500646_o
Before the reception, the team was introduced to a crowd of 500 or so supporters.
img_5627nc1215hPhotos available on Facebook.

Councillor Graham Chapman explained that the council built the Ice Arena cos –
1. they wanted a good place for young people and skaters to enjoy the sports;
2. they wanted a proper arena for bigger events;
3. they wanted to give the Panthers the chance to grow. 

Growth Deal implications for the city centre

A set of capital investment announcements made. Termed the “Growth Deal”, the scale of the changes are significant for Nottingham, and especially for Bridge ward.
From the ward’s perspective, the changes are designed to support a new Broadmarsh shopping centre and make the tram and bus services, cycling and walking more effective and pleasant.
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Please forgive my very unofficial high-level diagram.
Please find my own high-level explanation of the changes, as they affect the Bridge ward part of Nottingham, most of which is available online in various locations, but a good deal of the detail has to be worked through again.
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Collin Street and the northern block of Carrington Street can be pedestrianized; Canal Street’s role will be to enable access to the bus station and the car park from Middle Hill, but will no longer be a through road.
The changes will be made in 2016/17 alongside the renewal of the shopping centre.
A new tram stop to the east of Collin Street to serve Broadmarsh can be built.
Matching money was also announced to enable the college by the castle to be re-sited to the east of the tram viaduct (in Narrowmarsh).
Money had already been announced for “re-connecting the east side” – by which the aim is to stop Bellar Gate and Lower Parliament Street being such a barrier to those travelling west and east by foot and by bike. Bellar Gate is to become a two-way local access road with its third lane serving northbound bus services (probably). Lower Parliament Street can become two-way, with two lanes each, to support the through traffic.
Extra space and priorities will be sought for cyclists so that they at last get a proper route to the east of the city centre, and an east-west route through the city centre – connecting the Castle and Sneinton using Castle Gate, Low Pavement, Middle Pavement, High Pavement, Hollowstone, Fisher Gate and Pennyfoot Street to Manvers Street.
Changes will be needed to make the Southern Relief Route (Queens Drive to London Road) fulfil its original aim effectively, with re-modelled junctions at Wilford Road and Queens Road, but there will be no attempt to re-direct traffic through The Meadows.
You can read more about the growth deal here, and here which also includes plans for expanding BioCity and the enterprise zone near Boots, as well as skills.
Local residents and road users will look for –
– lower speeds, especially along Fisher Gate;
– safer crossing, especially at Pennyfoot Street;
– clearer priorities for, and visibility of, cyclists;
– better management of dropping off of, and collection of, visitors to the Ice Arena.
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