Super Whalley

WP_20170417_16_53_13_Pro ab0233h Salop attack at Northampton
Pressure for relegation threatened Salop.
But better play than home to Walsall and a surprise to go behind.
Distress at 2 Northampton forwards who seemed to run into clashes and be the first to hit the ground.
Second half, and Salop winger Whalley decides to run and run at the full-back, who I think had committed six fouls before he got his second yellow card.  This during a purple patch and when Whalley hit a sharp inswinging cross from the corner of the box, it had goal written all over it – Sadler rose to nod in from 3 feet.
It seemed then only a matter fo time before a winning goal, but Salop struggled to control the ball and keep it down, and even though a second Cobbler got a second yellow for repeated fouls, time had run out.
Results elsewhere all went Salop’s way so now 3 points clear of the drop – can the escape be made at the next home game?
Bizarrest thing of the day: Salop fans adapting the Supertramp song – “Logical” – as a tribute to Shaun Whalley.

There is no money tree

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Defending cuts to public services on the East Midlands version of BBC tv’ “Sunday Politics”, Conservative MP for Sherwood, Mark Spencer, said “There isn’t a money tree”.
Mediocre or what.
1. I don’t object to “quantative easing”, but it does feel a bit mythical and certainly, it’s been used for the benefit of the financial sector and the rich;
2. there is enough money to give away to corporations for cuts in their rates of tax;
3. what extra money announced above and beyond local government and health settlements has been awarded to those principal authorities with fewer less well off – Nottingham and Notts have lost out relative to Surrey – and you’d think a Notts MP would have something to say about that.

Comments (from 3rd April on…)
Alan Rhodes I object to being patronised by one of the most useless MP’s in Parliament
Alex Norris There isn’t a money tree. But there are choices. And time and time again this government have chosen to hit the poorest hardest to the benefit of the best off.

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Notts Police and Crime Panel February 2017

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Almost unanimous support for the increase in the precept.
Continued to explore VFM but the reality is we need uniformed officers still cos however much crime has come down, I can see the pressure on officers and the potential problems in The Meadows.
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Chief Constable Craig Guildford attended the panel for the first time in his new role.
In supporting the increase, I spoke again about the dramatic action we took in Nottingham in 2004, and that the Police and the local authority are a strategic partnership to work for community safety – and that partnership was hurt by actions taken over the city police decision – a decision that the new chief constable has an opportunity to review.
Acknowledgement that the Tri-Force proposals have been slow to progress and have not yet delivered any rewards; but progress was being sought.
A surprise that £20m of investment is now planned for changes to Bridewell, whose facilities don’t match Home Office standards.  Some opportunities it seems for revenue savings, but it seems the spend is needed for its own sake.
TO BE UPDATED.

Notts Police and Crime Panel December 2016

The first meetiwp_20161219_14_02_07_pro-ab0078h-ch-police-panelng after the appointment of the new Chief Constable who takes up the post on 1st February.
Sue Fish’s service was acknowledged.
Current issues:
– fall in satisfaction with the service – probably tied in with Police having to choose to not provide enough service, cos of the cuts (100 fewer officers);
– recruitment of BME officers;
– problems with changes in standards to the national recording system;
– national initiatives (d.g. digitalisation) requiring finance;
– grant for budget remaining constant for next year, but with inflation requiring savings of £5m.
Paddy expressed dismay at signitificant aspects of an HMIC report on Notts.
I raised concerns about how poverty, job insecurity, mental health provision and the broken up schools service were creating conditions for a repeat of the problems of the eighties.

TO BE UPDATED.