Herbert Kilpin

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On the centenary of his death, a shop front on Mansfield Road where Herbert Kilpin was born was dedicated to the Nottingham lace worker and footballer who founded AC Milan.
In the evening, a documentary “Lord of Milan” was released.
And from that film it’s clear that AC Milan wear red and black stripes, cos that what Herbert wore when he played for Notts Olympic.

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Our Lady and StPatrick’s 150th anniversary

Celebrating the catholic church that had first been built in The Narrowmarsh just by London Road island, and then built anew in The Meadows just off Robin Hood Way, the Bishop attended a special service and blessed a celtic-style cross that had been fashioned out of the fallen lime tress from Queens Walk.
Featured is resident and former work colleague, Mary Brown, and some of her family, her son having made the cross.

Minsk 950

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Nottingham’s twin city is celebrating the 950th anniversary of its formal beginning.
One concert told the city’s stories, including celebrating the iconic bison that still living in the forests that surround the city.

What would Nottingham’s stories be?
A place of caves;  by-passed by the Romans; founded by a Saxon chief; made an important borough by the Vikings;  made so important by the castle built by the Normans; a seige of the castle;  supporting the crusades, the city symbol and a taste for saffron; the stories of Robin Hood becoming about Nottingham castle at the time of the printing press; deposing of a queen in the castle; Goose Fair; a palace and a garden city, with caves used for brewing;  French and Germans fleeing religious persecution bringing knowledge of lace; not supporting the king in the civil war, even if he tried to raise his standard here; resisting Royalist seige of the castle; embracing tolerance post the civil war; the Quakers starting from a protest in St.Mary’s; industrialisation; textiles and lace; wealth in the good times, slums in the bad times, and riots – “Bannertown”; campaigns for proper jobs, proper wages, proper products and the vote; the Pentrich march, burning the palace at the castle, and the Battle of Mapperley Hills; canals and caves for chemical “engineering”; clean water plants; Empire and wealth through lace; railways and national sports and Notts County & Trent Bridge; expanding the city out of its historic boundaries; art school, the art gallery in the castle; becoming a city and the end of the French and Saxon boroughs; quality pharmaceuticals, soap, cigarettes, bicycles; The Great War; the new housing estates to the north and north-west – gardens back and front; the economic depression and the building of The Council House; the Second World War; a blitz and manufacturing anti-aircraft guns; a new deal – jobs, free health care at the point of need, success for all in schools, better housing  (Clifton and slum clearance), social security; cold war and threatened total destruction; the commonwealth and immigration; confronting racism; new democratisation of local government, slum clearances and radical transport policies – “zone and collar”; Europe and twinning; Nottingham Forest and Torvill & Dean; loss of confidence in government programmes, making the market king, globalisation, loss of manufacturing and mass unemployment & deprivation; growth in night life, universities and information technology; bdy scanning and bio-technology; a return to investing in health and education; new jobs and new immigration & multi-culturalism; better buses, light rail transit and asking commuters to pay; world economic crash and slum private landlords …

The 175th anniversary of the Battle of Mapperley Hills

August 1842 —
On The Thursday (18th), 2,000 resolved in the Market Square not to work until the terms of the Charter were met.
On The Tuesday (23rd), a rally of some 5,000 supporters met on Mapperley Hills Common (most probably the area just south of the GMB offices on Woodborough Road for a rally)..
At 3pm, as they ‘sat down for their dinner’, Dragoons brandishing swords (glittering in the bright sunshine) scattered the rally, arrested 400 and marched them into town. 50 were to end up being punished severely.
The actions of the authorities were mocked, a) by the mocking term of “Battle of Mapperley Hills” (cos the ‘battle was so one-sided – soldiers on horseback with weapons) and b) with a very long poem, published a month later.
(Photos of the poem are available – https://www.flickr.com/photos/154928849@N03/sets/72157687876247666)

I’ve made a 4 minute video (sorry, I didn’t appreciate until I got home how much I was grimacing cos I was concentrating on remembering what to say).
https://www.facebook.com/me4sd/videos/10154903369716305/

A previous video is a bit rough. With thanks to contributors to Wikipedia for the improved understanding and to the Local Studies Library on Angel Row.

Black Boy Hotel exhibition

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Demolished in 1970 after Littlewoods bought the hotel in 1964, the hotel was designed by Watson Fothergill and opened in 1897.
People testify to how beautiful and splendid it was with the slightest prompt.
An exhibition is on at Nottingham’s Industrial Museum at Wollaton Hall until the end of August and the highlight is a special model of the building as it was in the ’60s.
Displays tell the history of the hotel, including it being named after King Charles II, who had long black hair.

Selma and Pentrich

I missed Selma on its release (and have only just seen it on BBC 2 tv).  The film brings some stunning moments from the past to life – of government spying & brutality, of racism, of fear, of defiance.
Some controversy over the portrayal of President Johnson’s politics and actions – a shame the film couldn’t be more positive about him.
Still the big story – people denied political rights, people putting themselves at some risk from government sides and brutality.
Similar to the Hampden clubs / Luddites of 200 years ago who started marches on London, including the one from the industrial villages in Derbyshire such as Pentrich, who marched 200 years ago this June.
There would have been the same discussions over the problems life presents, how they have no power to get things changed, and how the actions they might be taking will be dangerous.  Even discussions when they’d realised they were being spied upon.
There are limits to the parallels.  Unlike the Southern Christrian Leadership Confrence, the rebels from 200 years ago were not non-violent, although their weapons were basic and not significant enough to make them do anything but run when they saw government forces ahead.
There are books and plays on the movements of the day – but not films.  Just don’t give such a movie to Mel Gibson.

International Women’s Day – 2017

C6aU6gDXQAEYVNOA tweet from Nottingham Library Services to tell us of Nottingham City’s first woman Councillor – Caroline Harper, whose obituary in the Nottingham Evening Post has been found from the online newspaper archive.
The tweet – ‘“Nottingham’s Pioneer Woman” who died in 1937: first female City Cllr, first female , first female Magistrate
I know the current residents of the house in Lucknow Avenue and they report –
“Surprisingly, we had not heard of the lady.
“An earlier resident here was the popular Town Clerk from 1912 to 1937 Sir William John Board OBE and his family; and

I have some info on him (was he known as Bill Board?).
“He died in 1946 and Lady Board in 1947, both aged 77.
“The City Engineer Brown, whose works included the Victoria Embankment and Wilford Bridge, lived next door.”
More anon.

Meanwhile, should not leave this topic without mentioning the first woman leader of the city council – Betty Higgins.

The Dilettante Society published an article on Nottingham suffragette Helen Watts via Left Lion.

17202721_954766740280_5698338505358977230_nMeanwhile, Gedling Borough Councillor Roxanne Ellis was part of a launch of a quilt commemorating the 598 women killed between 2009 and 2015, which was unveiled at the Houses of Parliament.
(From memory), one of the victims was from my home village, Hanwoodbank (in Salop).