Nottingham Forest banners


Seven banners shown last night before the Derby County derby, showing 7 Nottingham heroes –
Brian Clough, Robin Hood, DH Lawrence, Alan Sillitoe, Helen Watts, Eric Irons and Ned Ludd.
Meanwhile there was another banner across the stand celebrating Garibaldi of the red shirts fame that inspired the founders of the football club and their choice of colours.
Quite a radical choice – and not including often cited Albert Ball, Jesse Boot, Paul Smith, and less often cited Peter Mansfield and Stuart Adamson.

Forest won the derby 1-0, fine, though it turns out my Mum’s Dad supported Derby County after he moved there from the Black Country before WWI.

BTW, as explained elsewhere on the site, Forest played at a 10,000 stadium called the Town Ground, being the Town Arms pub win the city side of the Trent Bridge – home of the first crossbars used in football.
When they chose to expand – at the end of the 19th Century, Nottingham was celebrating being made into a city, so it seemed obvious to call the new ground the City Ground.
Back then the city boundary took in part of what is now regarded as West Bridgford, and only became part of Rushcliffe when a land swap gave the city land to build Clifton estate as well as Wilford village and Ruddington Lane in (circa) 1954).

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Torvill & Dean & Bolero celebrated

Kinda knew the ITV drama on Torvill & Dean would not be great.
Some moments in their developing lives that were not worked into a strong story for the programme. The story is no “I, Tonya”. If Jayne would have stopped but for the step change that the Bolero act was to represent, and if Bolero was as Chris is shown to have claimed – their story of a love that couldn’t be – it needed to come through, and perhaps be explained in contrast to the staid styles of others that they were breaking away from. Instead, Chris cold be a bit dictatorial, slightly remarks against work colleagues who probably did have to carry them (and hey, no mention of the City Council’s support for them).
But, I knew the programme was not great, and realised, and still watched.
Yes, it’s a Nottingham story. But I’d grown attached to Bolero (the original 15 minute version) in 1977. But I watched cos following them then was an emotional experience.

The BBC tried to help with a 2014 (check) documentary (“The Perfect Day”) re-shown on Boxing Day, but its credibility was damaged by including an interview with Jeffrey Archer telling ‘a man of the people’ story.

Per Rail portrays Nottingham in 1913

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A book from Edwardian times comprising of a series of articles on cities and towns along the Great Central Line, with 4 pages on Nottingham’s history and the offices, platforms and yards of the freight operations along Queens Walk.
Scans of the pages are available.  Interesting insights into the industries of “Nottingham – the Capital of the Lace World”.

Windrush: celebration of a generation

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A pleasure to attend a “celebration of a generation”., to speak and to represent Lilian Greenwood MP at the event and at the emergency Windrush surgery in April, during a crisis which saw a Home Secretary fall.
“Celebrating the heroes and heroines of the Windrush Generation that laboured in the NHS,factories, brought up families, whch contributed to the civic and cultural life of the UK.”  The celebration included stories, poetry and songs.
A pleasure to be asked to speak but had to be wary, as a football fan, of being asked to pick out a group of people, especially after a 6-1 victory, when football fans lose perspective and see yourselves as part of some kind of super race.
windrush england footballers 36636135_189863618360992_3475699217681350656_nA super race that now includes Danny Rose, Fabian Delph, Kyle Walker, Ashley Young, Keiran Trippier, Dele Alli, Marcus Rashford, Ruben Loftus-Cheek, Raheem Sterling and Jesse Lingard.
My, how England has changed!  Huge since our own Viv Anderson became the first black footballer to play a full international for England.
So much has already been said about the African-Caribbean community centres and the various people who have played big roles.  Such as Eric Irons, the first black local magistrate, and Milton Crossdale who played a big role in the City Council.  Currently we have 6 black city councillors – Leslie Ayoola, Merlita Bryan, Marcia Williams, Patience Ifediora, Corral Jenkins and Eunice Campbell.  Previous City Councillors – Hylton James, Des Wilson, Tony Robinson and Ron Mackintosh.  And George Powe – the first local black Councillor, who served on the County Council.
There is so much to say about so many, so to narrow the scope, let’s explore who helped when I was Lord Mayor?
The All-Stars: performed at the Lord Mayor’s Ball, which had a Caribbean theme; and at the Carnival in The Meadows, along with
The Ancestors: the local St.Kitts & Nevis masquerade troupe; launched with an event a Queens Walk Community Centre and took over the Lord Mayor’s parade;
The National Black Archive and Panya Banjoko: celebrating the overlooked achievements of black servicemen and reminding us of their commitment and service with a black poppy and a black poppy wreath;
Merlita Bryan and the Black Achievements awards;
ACNA: with their own 40th anniversary and celebrating Jamaica’s independence and 55th Anniversary;
Bishop James Stapleton: served as Lord Mayor’s Chaplain; introduced me to Psalm 133 – unity is a wonderful thing;  and a member of the Windrush Generation;
Jane Jeoffrey: secretary of Queens Walk Community Association, member of The Ancestors, read a prayer at the Lord Mayor’s Christmas Carol service and a member of the Windrush Generation.
And whose voice was so alike the lead in Shebeen; from which the romance between the young black man and white woman brought to life what George Powe and Jill Oswald must have gone through in Nottingham’s 1950’s.
One last thought – from Lenny Henry’s Mum.  Will never forget it.  Cos Lenny Henry said it so clearly.  What disappointed her so much on her arrival in Britain was the lack of respect.
Respect is one of Nottingham’s watchwords.  So let’s show it and keep on showing it.