Jeremy’s ten pledges

They are:
1 – Full Employment – a publicly-owned National Investment Bank and regional banks will back up £500bn of investment across energy, transport and housing.
2 – A Secure Homes Guarantee – over a million new homes in five years will be built, with at least half a million council homes, through its public investment strategy.
3 – Security at work – people will have stronger employment rights “from day one in a job”, an end to “exploitative zero hours contracts” and the creation of new sectoral collective bargaining rights.
4 – A secure NHS and social care – an end to any NHS services being outsourced to private health providers.
5 – A National Education Service – universal childcare to give all children a good start in life, allowing greater sharing of caring responsibilities and removing barriers to women participating in the labour market.
6 – Action to secure our environment – an expansion of green industries, using the National Investment Bank to invest in public and community-owned renewable energy.
7 – Put the public back into our economy – people will have “a real say in their local communities with increased local and regional democracy”.
8 – Cut inequality in income and wealth – the tax system will become “more progressive” so higher earners are “fairly taxed” and people on lower incomes will have their pay boosted through a higher minimum wage of £10 an hour.
9 – Action to secure an equal society – Labour will take action to tackle violence against women and girls, racism and discrimination on the basis of faith, and secure real equality for LGBT and disabled people.
10 – Peace and justice at the heart of foreign policy – human rights and social justice will be built into trade policy, while international treaty obligations on nuclear disarmament will be honoured as it encourages others to do the same.
Precis by inews.

On membership of the EU, Labour respects the outcome of the referendum, but has six tests for any deal negotiated.

Super Whalley

WP_20170417_16_53_13_Pro ab0233h Salop attack at Northampton
Pressure for relegation threatened Salop.
But better play than home to Walsall and a surprise to go behind.
Distress at 2 Northampton forwards who seemed to run into clashes and be the first to hit the ground.
Second half, and Salop winger Whalley decides to run and run at the full-back, who I think had committed six fouls before he got his second yellow card.  This during a purple patch and when Whalley hit a sharp inswinging cross from the corner of the box, it had goal written all over it – Sadler rose to nod in from 3 feet.
It seemed then only a matter fo time before a winning goal, but Salop struggled to control the ball and keep it down, and even though a second Cobbler got a second yellow for repeated fouls, time had run out.
Results elsewhere all went Salop’s way so now 3 points clear of the drop – can the escape be made at the next home game?
Bizarrest thing of the day: Salop fans adapting the Supertramp song – “Logical” – as a tribute to Shaun Whalley.

James Baldwin and Jermaine Jenas

I am not your Negro” is a presentation of a 30 page draft by notable and nationally known American commentator and writer, James Baldwin, who was often an effective communicator of the oppression black people in America suffered, and was emphatic in expressing that problem as an American problem, and not a black problem.
He knew, and was despairingly affected by the murders of, Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.
Billed as a documentary, but more an illustrated editorial – and none the worse for it – the piece covered wider issues – disappointment that wealth had not brought happiness, and also brought a reluctance to hold serious views.

And then a post-screening debate.
Straight into damning mainstream education, talking up alternative schools, emphasising development of the individual and absence of any common vision or programme.
And *they*, they, expressed concern about the dominance of the right.

At some stage, some of the people present might put a documentary together about the history of Nottingham, though it seems likely any such production is likely to focus on 1958 and the race riots.
And could any such documentary do any worse than BBC 3 tv’s “Teenage Knife Crime” – first broadcast on 3 April and filmed last December.
Host is Jermaine Jenas, Nottingham born and bred.
Notts. Police refused to co-operate and when you watch the production, you get why.
Relative stats., not absolute; wild statements from Jermaine at the end like “thousands” with no justification; ordinary streets like Holgate Road filmed for an interview in the dark that makes it look like a sinister place; even silhouettes of weeds on a wall filmed at night to make Nottingham look sinister; no challenge to statements of teenagers being interviewed; allowing the notions of rivalries between neighbourhoods to go unchallenged; music to set your nerves on end.
No proper analysis of what is no longer done that might have mitigated problems and no mention of cuts to public services, although there was one moment that talked about “we” are letting the kids down.
You can’t watch a film made in your city and often in your ward without having some thoughts about what more to do.
But it would be nice if Jermaine Jenas could do the same.